REVIEW ´ Megy a világ


SUMMARY Megy a világ

REVIEW ´ Megy a világ Ó [Read] ➪ Megy a világ By László Krasznahorkai – Connecfloor.co.uk A Hungarian interpreter obsessed with waterfalls at the edge of the abyss in his own mind wanders the chaotic streets of Shanghai A traveller reeling from the sights and sounds of Varanasi encounters A Hungarian interpreter obsessed with waterfalls at [Read] Megy a világ By László Krasznahorkai Connecfloor.co.uk A Hungarian interpreter obsessed with waterfalls at the edge of the abyss in his own mind wanders the chaotic streets of Shanghai A traveller reeling from the sights and sounds of Varanasi encounters A Hungarian interpreter obsessed with waterfalls at the edge of the abyss in his own mind wanders the chaotic streets of Shanghai A traveller reeling from the sights and sounds of Varanasi encounte.

Megy a világRs a giant of a man on the banks of the Ganges ranting on the nature of a single drop of water A child labourer in a Portuguese marble uarry wanders off from work one day into a surreal realm utterly alien from his daily toilsIn The World Goes On a narrator first speaks directly tells twenty one unforgettable stories then bids farewell ' for Megy a PDF or here I would leave this earth and these stars because I would take nothing with me' As László Krasznahork.

SUMMARY ↠ CONNECFLOOR.CO.UK ✓ László Krasznahorkai

Megy a világ Ä Rs a giant of a man on the banks of the Ganges ranting on the nature of a single drop of water A child labourer in a Portuguese marble uarry wanders off from work one day into a surreal realm utterly alien from his daily toilsIn The World Goes On a narrator first speaks directly tells twenty one unforgettable stories then bids farewell ' for Megy a PDF or here I would leave this earth and these stars because I would take nothing with me' As László Krasznahork. SUMMARY ↠ CONNECFLOOR.CO.UK ✓ László Krasznahorkai

REVIEW ´ Megy a világ László Krasznahorkai is a Hungarian novelist and screenwriter who is known for critically difficult and demanding novels often labelled as postmodern with dystopian and bleak melancholic themes He is probably best known through the oeuvre of the director Béla Tarr who has collaborated with him on several moviesKrasznahorkai has been honored with numerous literary prizes among them the highes.

László Krasznahorkai ✓ 1 REVIEW

László Krasznahorkai ✓ 1 REVIEW Ai himself explains 'Each text is about drawing our attention away from this world speeding our body toward annihilation and immersing ourselves in a current of thought or a narrative' The World Goes On is another masterpiece by the winner of the Man Booker International Prize 'The excitement of his writing' Adam Thirlwell proclaimed in the New York Review of books 'is that he has come up with his own original forms there is nothing else like it in contemporary literature'.

10 Comments on "REVIEW ´ Megy a világ"

  • Seemita

    REVIEW ´ Megy a világ Megy a világ A near 4 starsMy first acuaintance with László Krasznahorkai was through the dark and hypnotic Satantango Into the swooping belly of a dancing and delirious night a bunch of villagers had fallen prey to a fictitious dawn egged by a manipulative and mysterious stranger They were led to their ultimate doom not as much by the towering outsider as by their own failures to spot the cracks An apocalyptic blanket had rendered the book both bleak and brazen showcasing Krasznahorkai’s enviable skills of sealing a haunting painting with some unusual colors The World Goes On follows almost the same trajectory with the near same aplombThe book opens with a narrator who speaks narrates and bids farewell and under each of these three sessions ends up sharing 21 stories of myriad backgrounds The stories hop and leap across Ital


  • Josh

    REVIEW ´ Megy a világ Megy a világIt's hard to rate a book with a style that you can't uite put a finger on At times it made me feel claustrophobic anxious or otherwise panicked I felt like I couldn't take my eyes off of the page because if I looked one way or the other I'd be back in my own world I felt locked in sedated yet alert At other times I needed a break A few day's break It was exhaustingIt's rare that I have been so back and forth on a book and finished it especially with it being short stories or whatever the h


  • Paul Fulcher

    REVIEW ´ Megy a világ Megy a világOn the Man Booker International Shortlist Krasznahorkai is one of the world's finest writers but this is neither his best work War on War followed by Seiobo and Satantango nor the easiest introduction Herman and the Last Wolf Don't start here as one for Krasznahorkai completists only but then everyone should be a Krasznahorkai completist It didn’t matter if it was fifteen miles from Los Angeles eighteen miles from Kyoto or twenty miles to the north of Budapest it simply sat there looking sad watching over its companion waiting for someone to come along to whom it might explain what had really happened or just sitting and waiting for the other to get up at last and make some movement so that the pair of them might vanish from this incomprehensible place The World Goes On is the translation by a combination of John Batki Ottilie Mulzet and George Szirtes of László Kraszn


  • Lee

    REVIEW ´ Megy a világ Megy a világKrasznahorkai can do no wrong for me and my rating might well be meaningless as I'm completely biased I love what he's doing and urge everyone who hasn't to read him immediately I'm not sure how to describe his style part Bernhard part Broch part Young but I'm addicted to it


  • Sidharth Vardhan

    REVIEW ´ Megy a világ Megy a világA sort of lite Beckett with international settingsIn his lecture on Joyce's Ulysses Nabhokov pointed out that the famous last chapter of the novel comprising of 8 ridiculously large sentences would have read just as beautifully if Joyce's ed


  • Jim Elkins

    REVIEW ´ Megy a világ Megy a világWhat's Wrong with KrasznahorkaiI seem to be one of a very few people who do not value Krasznahorkai's fiction His work is a lesson in how treacherous it is to keep Kafka too much in mind while you're writing He often substitutes atmosphere for both ideas and structure and he apparently feels that lugubrious dark intolerable cold sad bleak and deadly landscapes he conjures are both naturally and sufficiently expressive of his often vague but persistent ideas about melancholy and memory which are themselves derivative of prewar European fiction Here I complain briefly about a half dozen stories in the collection and then under number 2 uote one of the essays in its entirety and complain about it at length1The first piece Wandering Standi


  • Calzean

    REVIEW ´ Megy a világ Megy a világA lot of long winding sentences narrated by a series of depressing males in a series of depressing stories Not sure what to make of this Is it philosophy A sign that Hungary Germany and the world is in deep despair It certainly is different Did I enjoy it No


  • Robert Wechsler

    REVIEW ´ Megy a világ Megy a világMixed reaction as with just about any story collection The volume starts off with some short lightweight pieces and nearly ends with the only long story that didn’t work for me “That Gagarin” neither did the short pieces following it In between I found the medium and long stories anywhere from interesting to amazing Not a must read but Krasnahorkai is a remarkable writer


  • Richard Newton

    REVIEW ´ Megy a világ Megy a világThis book grew on me To begin with I found the style pages and pages of fairly repetitive thinking without break or full stops rather dull and irritating It felt like listening to one of those dull friends who cannot ever get to the point whose conversation drones on meandering around and which you cannot exactly follow But somehow I got into the swing of it and started to enjoy it Krasznahorkai's style is not going to suit everyone perhaps not even many It certainly would not fit into the category of easy reads It is difficult to describe and probab


  • Sean

    REVIEW ´ Megy a világ Megy a világWhere Seiobo There Below locates a sort of divine transcendence in aesthetic experience The World Goes On obversely finds a debasement of the sublime within a wholly terrestrial world and a failure of perception and language to attend to that inexpressible infinite complexity that is reality itself Taken together these two volumes affirm Krasznahorkai's status as one of the essential voices in literature today